Thursday, November 20, 2014

For Sale: 1959' ish Schwinn Paramount road bike 62CM

     Offered for sale today is a 1959' ish Schwinn Paramount road bike. Serial number B72 according to Waterford's site puts production in the area of fall 1959. This is the second number system Schwinn used from 1959-1965. The bike is built with a mostly a later Campagnolo Nuovo Record component group. The hubs are Campagnolo HF "no record" laced to unknown tubular  (sew-up) rims, tires are bad and need to be replaced. Campagnolo NR rear derailleur pat. 73 stamp. Campagnolo NR front derailleur. Campagnolo DT clamp on shifters and cable guide. Stronglight 49D cranks with Stronglight BB as well (52-42 chain ring combo). universal mod.61 brakes and scuffed up Weinmann red dot brake levers. Ambrosio Champion road stem (95mm extension). Clamp pinch bolt is seized, hence the odd bar position. unknown alloy bars, 38 CM wide CTC. campagnolo NR seat post (27.2) with Brooks Pro saddle, dark brown, large rivets, in good condition. Lyotard touring pedals with XL steel toe clips (Christophe Special).Unknown headset, perhaps Stronglight. Campagnolo pump head without safety circle.
  •     The frame has been re-painted and has no decals. Paint color is a faded teal green. no headbadge either.  Campagnolo drop outs with eyelets.
  • 62 CM seat tube CTC 
  • 61 top tube CTC.
  • 34" stand over height (no air in tires)
     Please contact me at:  bikeville@gmail.com for pricing or with any additional questions, thanks!























    

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Happy Birthday to our founder Curtis Anthony!

Happy birthday to one hell of a guy! Curtis Anthony, the founder of Via Bicycle! Many more my friend!

Saturday, November 15, 2014

Period correct restoration critique- Brian Robinson’s Raphaël Géminiani bike

Photos: Chris Catchpole, Allsport Hulton/Archive from Cycling Weekly article found here

Photos: Chris Catchpole, Allsport Hulton/Archive from Cycling Weekly article found here

A recent article on Cycling Weekly website showcasing Brian Robinson’s Raphaël Géminiani bike and describing the technologies available at the time has peaked my interest. On the surface, the restoration looks great, most of the parts fit the bill of a late 1950s French vintage lightweight. As the article points out, this was not Mr. Robinson's TDF stage victory bike, but one of his bikes that was
"lovingly restored so it’s almost exactly like the one he rode in 1959. The restoration means it looks as fresh as it did in 1959, too."
Upon closer inspection there are a few items that are off by a couple years and one part is glaringly incorrect on this restoration.

I will preface this critique by saying it is very difficult to do a complete restoration, from stem to stern. Parts are difficult to source and knowing exactly what is correct and what is passable can sometimes be subjective.  I tried to stick to just the facts, well the parts. Paint color and finish can be very subjective. And yes, I know it is easier to critique a work of art than create one, this is professional critique, not personal.
Photos: Chris Catchpole, Allsport Hulton/Archive from Cycling Weekly article found here

Photos: Chris Catchpole, Allsport Hulton/Archive from Cycling Weekly article found here
 I first noticed the Mafac Competition brakes, that were a product of the mid 1960s, and examining the photo of Brian Robinson riding, one can see they appear to be Mafac Dural Forged brakes. I also noticed the Campagnolo headset is a mix of various models- the adjustable cup is 1960s-1970s Gran Sport, whereas the lower cup is Record/Nuovo Record. I won't be as critical to comment on cable ferrules or cable end caps. . .
Photos: Chris Catchpole, Allsport Hulton/Archive from Cycling Weekly article found here
It is a cool downtube waterbottle cage, I don't understand how the one clamp at the top of the cage supports the cage from moving or coming off.
Photos: Chris Catchpole, Allsport Hulton/Archive from Cycling Weekly article found here
 Modified Brooks saddle, article mentioned Otussi, but there is no common Otussi stamp found on one of the large rivets.
Photos: Chris Catchpole, Allsport Hulton/Archive from Cycling Weekly article found here

Photos: Chris Catchpole, Allsport Hulton/Archive from Cycling Weekly article found here
The shifters are from the 1970s- looking at the logo on the band and the hardware with the shifters is newer as well. The original, late 1950s shifters, would have used a screw head rather than the later D screws. The logo on the shifters could have also included the "open -C" Campagnolo stamping, but that is a grey area. In the late 1950s, Campagnolo was phasing out the open-C stamping, but some bikes in the 1960s were found new with them.
The handlebar stem is wrong. It is 1980s-1990s.


Photos: Chris Catchpole, Allsport Hulton/Archive from Cycling Weekly article found here
The photo, with the caption "Tullio Campagnolo invented the quick release back in 1930, and they’ve changed little since," shows a 1990s-2000s SHIMANO quick release skewer.

Patent Pending

I like home spun solutions to bike (mechanical) problems. Broken pedal block, no problem! a couple zip ties will have you back on the road in no time!

Friday, November 14, 2014

Hill Cycle Envelope

     I came across this  envelope today with a Hill Cycle return address stamp on the front. Wow! So cool! I wonder if you could get away with taking up this much real estate on an envelope these days? I am guessing this is from the 1960's- early 70's. #saveeverything


Thursday, November 13, 2014

For Sale: Cinelli adjustable Pista stem

     Super badass item here. Cinelli adjustable Pista stem in great shape with original stem and pinch bolts! All steel construction. 22.2 insertion, 25.4 clamp diameter. Slider goes from about 50mm-170mm extension. A bit of peppering in the chrome in a couple areas, mostly on the top of the extension by the Cinelli crest logo. logo is still plainly visible. These were used for sizing or changing up position depending on event. Super rare item especially with original hardware and in this condition!
                                               Email at: bikeville@gmail.com for pricing.













Wednesday, November 12, 2014

For Sale: Mid 1980's Ernie Atkinson track frame and fork 55CM

     Here is a nice track frame and fork I have for sale today. It was built by Ernie Atkinson in Astoria,  Oregon in the mid 1980's. It has a stamp of "EA 85" on the BB shell, which I assume means Ernie Atkinson 1985. He is a small builder there and is still around,  not sure if he is still building bikes though. I have only seen one other of his bikes, a very nicely made road frame. It is built with Reynolds 531 tubing and has a nice fast back seat stay attachment. The lugs are all nicely filed. it is drilled for both front and rear brakes, maybe this was a winter training bike? Nice flat fork crown with reinforcing tangs on the inside of the beefy round blades. The rear drop outs have been drilled to accept a rack, I assume. I do not know if this feature is original to the build or not, they appear to have been done later by someone. Requires a 27.2 seat post. The BB shell is English threaded (1.370 X 24 TPI) and the steerer is English as well. The decals are Letraset style on top of the paint, which has some chips and knicks here and there. The frame is straight and the fork is  in alignment. The measurements are as follows:
  • 55 CM seat tube CTC
  • 56 CM top tube CTC
  • 31 1/2" stand over without head set or inflated tires.
     Some of the decals are on a little bit crooked, kind of charming. lets you know they were placed by hand!  Please email at: bikeville@gmail.com for price or with any questions you may have. Thanks!